Review Revision (July, 2017)

Here we go, a revision of the past month. As before, the short story is excluded in the average rating.

reviewrevision2

You’re Not Dead by Jason Garden

You’re Not Dead chronicles its Hero’s travels during his ten-month hospitalization, beginning with his viral meningoencephalitis, and ending with his struggle to regain his life and independence. Acerbic and illuminating, You’re Not Dead pulls the reader into the Hero’s lived experience, while peeling away the layers of politeness we often use when discussing disability. The Hero is brutally honest as he writes of his journey through the medical system. He speaks of overwhelming pessimism, of pronouncements from “on high” made with little knowledge of his condition or progress, and of being spoken at, rather than being spoken to. You’re Not Dead is both devastating and inspiring, highlighting the importance of perseverance in the face of profound adversity.

Book recommendation: 7,5/10

Bob and the Cyber-Llama by Joseph Caldara

Bob Halibut used to live your average life: he had a steady job at Porkburger. He had a decent apartment. And it was boring as all get-out. But then he inherited a grand fortune from his grandmother. After meeting a posh, cybernetic llama butler, he learns of his grandmother’s secret former life and embarks on a journey to the pyramids to uncover the secrets of a lost civilization. What he discovers will test his courage, as well as his swordsmanship skills. “Bob and the Cyber-Llama” is an exciting, laugh-out-loud, all-beef 12-pack of adventure fiction hot dogs. It’s a fantastic read for kids, adults, teens, super-intelligent chihuahuas, flying robots, and otherworldly alien deities alike.

Book recommendation: 10/10

The Adventures of JoJo Smith by Tony Leslie Duxbury

This a tongue-in-cheek fantasy tale about a young man who, through no fault of his own, is transported to a medieval world. Scared witless, all he wants is to be sent home. Considered harmless, he is ignored. Deciding to take things into his own hands, he hits on the idea of making a revolution to gain his ends. Recruiting some unlikely helpers, he forms a plan and puts it into action. Of course, things go wrong from the start, but they win through in the end.

Book recommendation: 7,5/10

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The classic supernatural thriller by an author who helped define the genre

First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill Househas been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of a “haunting”; Theodora, his lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a friendless, fragile young woman well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the future heir of Hill House. At first, their stay seems destined to be merely a spooky encounter with inexplicable phenomena. But Hill House is gathering its powers—and soon it will choose one of them to make its own.

Book recommendation: 9/10

At Horizon’s End by Chris Sarantopoulos

The Man Who Fed On Tears always knows whose time it is to pluck from the world of the living. His existence is one of a symbiosis between his need for the tears and woe he causes to those closest to the deceased, and the natural order of life and death to which he is bound. He never questions himself or his actions and has never made a mistake. Until now.

Stella is a four-year-old girl who misses her mommy and wants to see her again. She doesn’t yet understand the concept of loss, so when she sees close family members crying, she tries to stay cheerful and optimistic. After all, Mommy said they’d see each other again when the time comes At Horizon’s End. So if they’ll meet again, why is everyone crying?

Book recommendation: 5/5

_____________________

Average rating for this month: 8,5

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